valley of the giants tree top walk, tips to visit tree top walk, visit valley of giants with kids, tips to get the best out of your visit to the tree top walk

Top Tips to visit the Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk with Kids

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The Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk is one of Western Australia’s most iconic sites! With good reason – this place is awesome, combining a walk through the base some of the biggest trees we have ever seen with a bird’s eye view at the tops of the trees from a very cool upside down suspension bridge.

We’re fans of the Walpole Wilderness area and love this nature based escape destination. For a full list of 12 things to do in Walpole with Kids check out our comprehensive blog post.

Over the past few years we’ve been lucky enough to visit the Tree ToP Walk and have compiled this awesome list of how to best prepare for a trip to the Valley of the Giants Tree ToP Walk with Kids.

Once you arrive at the site, there are three main things to see, the 600metre walk around the top of the Tree Tops to a height of 40 metres, another shorter walk through the bases of the Red Tingle Trees and then a quirky information centre.

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super excited to be on the Tree Top Walk!

  1. Go around the Tree Top Walk two or more times!

Your ticket gives you entry to the Tree ToP Walk and once you are in, you can go around and around. It takes about 20 minutes to walk around, and the first time we were so caught up by the height and movement of the suspension bridge (yes, it wobbles!) we didn’t really look at the trees. Second time round, we relaxed and got the famous bird’s eye view… listened to the wind in the trees, marvelled at the view and did some bird watching. So definitely take a hike twice!

The Tree Top Walk is 100% pram friendly and we were glad that our active toddler was strapped in!

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Yes, you can walk through a living tree!

  1. Stand inside a living tree!

Don’t miss the Ancient Empire – as the name suggests, this short walk is like you have stepped back to when dinosaurs roamed the planet. Walk through giant hollow butted Red Tingles which are still alive. Following on from Tip #1, do the Tree Top Walk, then do the Ancient Empire and then return to the Tree ToP Walk for some fascinating views on perspective. (We also did this at a place called the Giant Tingle Tree – an excellent experience!)

  1. Visit Early or Late in the day to get the place to yourself.

This is one of Western Australia’s most iconic sites and so can get very busy, especially in the Christmas – New Year Break. Don’t do what we did and visit during that time – the parking was very full and there were queues on the Tree ToP Walk. So much for communing with nature! If you have to visit in this busy period aim to arrive early in the morning or late in the afternoon and apparently you will have the place to yourself. Contact the Tree Top Walk for their extended summer hours.

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window out into the wilderness

  1. Check out the School Holidays Activities Program for Kids

The Tree Top Walk offer a great range of activities for kids of all ages – check them out to get new insight to the forest or to extend your stay. Operate during all school holidays except winter.

  1. Do the night walk!

As part of the Kids Activity program and at other times of the year, they have a night time walk once a week, called “Late Night Fridays”. We will be doing this during the Summer Holidays so stay tuned for an update!

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this tree is Grandmother Tingle and over 400 years old

Photography tips

This place is a photographer’s paradise while also being such a challenge! Check out our Full blog post Photography Tips for the Tree Top Walk

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congratulations – the highest point of the Tree Top Walk!

How to get there– Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk

The Valley of the Giants is about 420 kilometres from Perth, located on the Valley of the Giants Road off the South Coast Highway, Nornalup. From Denmark it’s about a 45-minute drive west along South Coast Highway, from Walpole it is about 20 minutes. We recommend staying either in Walpole or Denmark the night before your visit to break the car trip and enjoy some of the other great things in the area. See also our list of things to do in Walpole with Kids. https://worldoftravelswithkids.com/2016/10/28/things-to-do-in-walpole-for-kids/

How long do I need to spend – Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk

You would need a minimum of 1 hour to visit this site; however that would make it very poor value for money as the Tree Top Walk entry is relatively expensive. We would recommend planning your visit and spending at least 2 hours. See also https://parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au/site/tree-top-walk

Value for Money

At $52.50 for a Family of 2 Adults and 2 Kids, but only 1-2 hours of activities then this is a relatively expensive activity. We strongly recommend looking at our different suggestions here to make the visit a bit longer. Note; many holiday activities have an extra charge!

Top Tip! If you decide you don’t want to fork out for the Tree ToP Walk the friendly ladies in the Shop told us you can walk around the Ancient Empire for FREE!!!

Best places to stay with Kids around the Tree Top Walk

When you are this far south it’s awesome to stay on a farm or among the big trees to unplug and enjoy the peaceful feeling. Please check out our full post Places to Stay near to the Tree top Walk

Questions?

Please feel free to ask any Questions, we are a normal family who loves to get out and about with our littlies.

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